Asperger Syndrome: Making the Transition to Adulthood

Parents who have children with Asperger Syndrome often worry about life after school.  They worry, just as any other parent does about college, living independently, finding a job, and having relationships.  Parents of children with Asperger Syndrome should think about this transition earlier than other parents.  Parents should be working with their children to become independent and to strengthen their areas of interests. 

What does happen after the free public education is gone and they have to start earning a living or living an adult life?  There are a number of situations to consider when making the transition from child to adulthood, here are a few:

  • Is your child with Asperger’s the type that would enjoy continuing their education with a venture to college or are they simply glad to be done with the education they have?  Many colleges and universities make special accommodations to allow those with disabilities to be educated on a post-secondary level.  If not, is there a trade that a trade school or vocation tech could help them learn?  A trade to make a living or keep interest beyond normal?
  • Those with Asperger’s enjoy completing tasks and having well-defined goals or routines which are exactly the things average people don’t enjoy about a job.  An adult with Asperger’s could excel in a task-based or information gathering position at any number of businesses in the world.  An employment opportunity that allows for support and security along with a sense of accomplishment will suit their needs.
  • Is your young adult with Asperger’s able to take care of grocery shopping or paying monthly bills?  If so, then they are most likely capable of living on their own and gaining the independence and satisfaction that comes along with it.  If not, look into a group home that offers interaction with a like-minded individual.  A sense of belonging goes along way in helping develop the social communications skills that people with Asperger’s have.

These are just three things to consider when your child with Asperger’s is making the transition from child to adulthood.  Consider your child’s options and consult with a doctor or parent in the same situation for more help.

Entry Filed under: Asperger Syndrome

1 Comment Add your own

  • 1. Sue Lowery  |  October 15th, 2007 at 8:59 pm

    You have identified the problem with a young adult who wants to transition into independent living…but I am unable to find any group homes, services, help unless my son, 23 is in a dire, dire emergency.

    Where are all the young adult who have been able to move out on their own and how did they find services?

    Thanks for any direction…we live in Tennessee. Our son is able to work (because he has employers that hire people with disabilities) and he can function ONLY because we provide a support system for him.

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